Allergist Versus Ear, Nose, and Throat Doctor

Allergy Doctor, Peachtree City, Atlanta, Georgia

Freedom Allergy, Ruchir Agrawal, Peachtree City, Fayetteville, Georgia

Why Choose an Allergist for your Allergy and Asthma?

Allergies and asthma are both chronic conditions, and warrant visiting a specialist for the best management. However, with so many specialists out there, how do you know which one to choose?  Read the FAQ below.

My allergies bother my ears, nose and throat – doesn’t this mean I should see an ear, nose and throat doctor?

Many times, patients go directly to an ear, nose and throat (ENT) doctor for their allergy symptoms. After all, don’t allergies bother your ears, nose and throat?

Ear, Nose and Throat doctors are surgeons who specialize mainly in structural problems that can be corrected with surgery. But many of these problems, such as difficulty breathing through the nose, or having a raspy voice or having trouble hearing, are actually due to allergies.  Allergies, eczema, and asthma are all chronic conditions that fall under the same umbrella of allergy medicine, and more than 50% of sinus problems are caused by allergies.  The other 50% are often caused by a combination of both allergy and non-allergy related problems. Continue reading

Spring Allergies

Spring Allergies, Allergy Doctor, Peachtree City, Georgia

Allergy Doctor Ruchir Agrawal Peachtree City Georgia

Spring is right around the corner, and now is the time to schedule a visit with your allergist.  The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) suggests five things you should know about spring allergies.  Click Here to read more!

  1. Allergies are on the rise.

Studies show pollen counts have been gradually increasing over time, and even if you’ve never had allergies before, you could start developing them.  You can track Peachtree City pollen counts Here.

  1. It matters when you medicate!

If you suffer spring allergies, ACAAI recommends starting your medication two weeks before your symptoms typically begin.

  1. No “cure” exists for spring allergies…

…but allergy shots (immunotherapy) can help your symptoms in a big way.

  1. Allergies can trigger or worsen asthma.

If you are coughing, wheezing, or having trouble breathing, this could be asthma that is triggered by your allergies.  Be sure to talk to your allergist about these symptoms.

  1. “When in doubt, get checked out.”

If you have been suffering symptoms for more than two weeks, such as coughing, ongoing colds, nasal congestion, or trouble breathing, it would be a good idea to see an allergist for allergy testing and potential treatment.

Conditions & Procedures

Allergy & Asthma Doctor, Peachtree City, Marietta , Georgia

Conditions We Treat

  • Adverse Drug Reactions
  • Angioedema
  • Asthma
  • Allergic Rhinitis
  • Allergies (Seasonal, Food, Environmental)
  • Anaphylaxis
  • Aspirin Allergy and Desensitization
  • Chronic Cough
  • Cough from Allergies
  • Dry Eyes from Allergic Rhinitis
  • Dry Throat and Runny Nose
  • Eczema
  • Eosinophilic Esophagitis
  • Eosinophilic Disorders
  • Food Allergy
  • Food Intolerance (Comprehensive Diagnosis and Management)
  • Environmental Allergies
  • Functional Medicine
  • Headaches, Fatigue and Cold Symptoms
  • Hives/Urticaria
  • Immunodeficiency
  • Integrative Medicine
  • Recurrent Infections
  • Sinus and Nasal Infections
  • Sinusitis (Acute)
  • Sinusitis (Chronic)
  • Skin Rashes
  • Sneezing (Frequent and Prolonged)
  • Stuffy Nose
  • Vocal Cord Dysfunction
  • Wheezing

Procedures We Offer

Conditions We Treat

  • Adverse Drug Reactions
  • Angioedema
  • Asthma
  • Allergic Rhinitis
  • Allergies (Seasonal, Food, Environmental)
  • Anaphylaxis
  • Aspirin Allergy and Desensitization
  • Chronic Cough
  • Cough from Allergies
  • Dry Eyes from Allergic Rhinitis
  • Dry Throat and Runny Nose
  • Eczema
  • Eosinophilic Esophagitis
  • Eosinophilic Disorders
  • Food Allergy
  • Food Intolerance (Comprehensive Diagnosis and Management)
  • Environmental Allergies
  • Functional Medicine
  • Headaches, Fatigue and Cold Symptoms
  • Hives/Urticaria
  • Immunodeficiency
  • Integrative Medicine
  • Recurrent Infections
  • Sinus and Nasal Infections
  • Sinusitis (Acute)
  • Sinusitis (Chronic)
  • Skin Rashes
  • Sneezing (Frequent and Prolonged)
  • Stuffy Nose
  • Vocal Cord Dysfunction
  • Wheezing

When Should I see an Allergist?

Allergy Asthma Doctor Atlanta Peachtree City Georgia

When Should I See An Allergist?

Asthma and allergies are two of the most common health problems in America.  Approximately 50-55 million Americans suffer from asthma, hay fever, eczema, food allergies and other allergic disorders.

You should schedule an appointment with an allergist if your asthma or allergic disorders are not controlled by over the counter medications or current prescription medications.

Board certified allergists are medical doctors who complete three years of internal medicine or pediatric training, and then go on to complete two- to three more years of fellowship training. Allergist are trained to diagnose and treat conditions ranging from uncontrolled runny nose and congestion to severe immune deficiency disorders.

Let’s talk about a few conditions for which you should see an allergist:

Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever): Allergic rhinitis plagues many Americans.  If your allergies are not controlled by over-the-counter (OTC) antihistamines (Zyrtec, Allegra, Claritin, Benadryl, etc.) or nasal steroids (Nasacort is approved OTC, and Flonase will be available OTC in 2015), you should schedule an appointment with an allergist.  An allergist will evaluate your allergy triggers and suggest treatments accordingly.  Treatments may include medications, sublingual (under the tongue) allergen immunotherapy, or allergy shots. Allergen immunotherapy is a very effective long-term allergy treatment, and 85-90 percent of patients experience relief with this treatment. Continue reading

Asthma Facts

Asthma Doctor Kids Atlanta Peachtree City Georgia

  • Asthma is a chronic inflammation of the lung airways that causes coughing, chest tightness, wheezing or shortness of breath.
  • The number of Americans with asthma grows every year. Currently, 26 million Americans have asthma.
  • Asthma mortality is almost 4,000 deaths per year.
  • Patients with asthma reported 13.9 million visits to a doctor’s office and 1.4 million visits to hospital outpatient departments.
  • Asthma results in 456,000 hospitalizations and 2.1 million emergency room visits annually.
  • Asthma is the most common chronic illness in childhood, accounting for 10.5 million missed school days each year. It also accounts for 14.2 million lost work days for adults.
  • The estimated economic cost of asthma is $20.7 billion annually.
  • Direct medical expenditures associated with asthma, including hospital care, physicians’ services and medications, are estimated at $15.6 billion annually.
  • Indirect medical expenditures, including decreased worker productivity and lost work days for adults suffering from asthma or caring for children with asthma, and other losses total $5.1 billion annually.
  • Triggers that can initiate an asthma attack include allergens such as pollen, dust, animal dander, drugs and food additives, as well as viral respiratory infections and physical exertion.
  • Asthma is often hereditary.
  • Weather conditions such as extremely dry, wet or windy weather can worsen an asthma condition.
  • Effective asthma treatment includes monitoring the disease with a peak flow meter, identifying and avoiding allergen triggers, using drug therapies including bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory agents, and developing an emergency plan for severe attacks.
  • There are two types of asthma medications: long-term control and quick-relief medications. Long-term control medications are preventive, taken daily to achieve and maintain control of asthma symptoms. Quick-relief medications are used to treat asthma attacks. They relieve symptoms rapidly and are taken on an as-needed basis.
  • One of the most effective medications for controlling asthma is inhaled corticosteroids, which are anti-inflammatory medications. Taken early and as directed, these well-tolerated and safe medications can improve asthma control and normalize lung function.
  • Immunotherapy or allergy shots should be considered if asthma is triggered by exposure to unavoidable allergens, or if symptoms occur three days a week and more than two nights a month. The shots are especially helpful when symptoms occur year-round or are not easily controlled with medication.
  • Allergists are the medical specialists with the most expertise in treating asthma. An allergist can find the source of your suffering and stop it. To find an allergist, visit AllergyAndAsthmaRelief.org.
  • The greatest rise in asthma rates is among black children with an almost 50 percent increase from 2001 through 2009.

Learn More About Asthma Here!

Source:  American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.  Asthma Facts.  2014.  http://www.acaai.org/allergist/news/Pages/Asthma_Facts.aspx.

About Asthma

Allergy, Asthma Doctor, Atlanta, Peachtree City, Georgia

Click Here to learn more from the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the lungs. It is a very common condition, where the airways of the lungs become enflamed.  These airways, or bronchial tubes, allow air to circulate through the lungs.  When an irritant or trigger is present, the airways become swollen and the muscles around the airways tighten. This makes it difficult for air to move through the lungs, resulting in symptoms like wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath and/or chest tightness.  Wheezing is the most common symptom.

Asthma ranges in severity from mild (infrequent wheezing and occasional use of quick relief inhaler) to severe (daily use of asthma medications to reduce inflammation).  Asthma can affect all age groups, but it most often starts during early childhood with the symptoms of frequent cough or wheezing. Asthma symptoms often occur at night or early in the morning hours. In the US, more than 25 million people are known to have asthma. About seven million of these people are children!

 

Below is a table describing different forms of asthma, and the populations affected.

Childhood Asthma

Form of Asthma Age/Demographic Group
Transient Early Wheezing or Wheezy Bronchitis Most common in infancy and preschool years.
Persistent Allergy-Associated Asthma Most common in school-age children, adults and the elderly.
Non-Allergic or Non-Atopic Asthma Associated with bronchial hyper-responsiveness at birth, continues into childhood. Skin and blood tests are negative for aeroallergens.
Asthma Associated with Obesity, Female Gender and Early-Onset Puberty Emerges between 6 and 11 years of age.
Asthma Mediated by Occupational Exposures A type of childhood asthma in children living in associated regions.
Triad Asthma Asthma associated with chronic sinusitis, nasal polyps, and/or NSAID hypersensitivity (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin and ibuprofen. Rarely begins in childhood.

Risk Factors for Persistent Asthma

Risk Factor Examples
Allergy – Atopic Dermatitis
– Allergic Rhinitis
– Elevated Total Serum IgE
– Peripheral Blood Eosinophilia >4-5%
– Environmental and Food Allergen Sensitization
Gender Male
– Transient Wheezing
– Persistent Allergy
– Associated Asthma
Females
– Asthma Associated with Obesity and Early-Onset Puberty
– Triad Asthma (Adulthood)
Persistent Asthma – Severe or persistent asthma
Lower respiratory infections – Rhinovirus, Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)
– Severe Bronchiolitis
– Pneumonia
Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure – Firsthand or secondhand smoke exposure