OIT – A life-changing treatment

Pediatric Allergist, Peachtree City, Fayetteville, Marietta, Georgia

 

OIT – A life-changing treatment

written by Heather B.

 

IMG_1824My daughter Zoe started OIT for peanut in July 2015. She was 6 years old and had a level 6 peanut allergy. Dr. Agrawal was so patient and kind making her and us feel comfortable every step of the way. I was very nervous for her to start OIT but my anxiety over her allergy was increasing, especially at school.

We found out about OIT through a friend who had also started peanut OIT with Dr. Agrawal. She stayed on the first dose for almost a month because of hives but after that it has been smooth. She is now in maintenance 11 months later and the freedom we have gained is invaluable! Zoe can now sit with her friends at lunch, eat kit-kat’s, and have m&m’s! Things that were impossible a year ago. This has been a life changer for her and I’m forever grateful for all the staff and for Dr. A at Freedom Allergy. Anytime I had a concern I could easily reach out to him and he responded almost immediately. I’ve never met a doctor who cares about patients as much as he does. We are looking forward to our final peanut challenge next year and graduating OIT!

 

Senate Bill 126: Access to Epinephrine Auto-Injectors in Public Facilities

Allergy Doctor, Peachtree City, Atlanta, Georgia

Senate Bill 126

Photo courtesy of Food Allergy Kids of Atlanta

In 2013, Georgia became one of the first states to pass legislation authorizing public and private schools to stock a supply of epinephrine auto-injectors in their facilities (House Bill 337).  This year, the Georgia General Assembly passed Senate Bill 126, which provides access to auto-injectors in public facilities such as restaurants, sporting facilities, amusement parks, resorts, and sports and recreation camps.  The bill provides for emergency public access stations to allow a “lay rescuer” to consult with a medical professional to administer or make available epinephrine auto-injectors in the case of a medical emergency.  This measure could be life-saving for anyone in a public facility suffering an anaphylactic reaction.

Read more here.

Fall Allergies Are Upon Us

Allergy and Asthma Doctor, Atlanta, Georgia  

Freedom Allergy, Fall Allergies Ragweed, Atlanta, Georgia

Autumn is rapidly approaching. As backpacks fill with homework, football games kick off, and the Georgia heat simmers down, many know ragweed season also lurks around the corner. Ragweed grows most predominantly in the southern, northeastern and midwestern United States, and thrives in warm, humid environments. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, 75% of people who are allergic to pollen-producing plants also suffer ragweed allergies. Ragweed emits a particularly large amount of pollen – up to 1 billion pollen grains per plant – and the pollen can extend up to two miles into the atmosphere. Ten to twenty percent of Americans suffer ragweed allergy flare-ups near the end of the summer, usually peaking around early September, and these flare-ups can lead to asthma exacerbations, headaches, and chronic sinusitis. With fall allergy season already upon us, do not wait to schedule an appointment with your board certified allergist, who can help keep your allergies and asthma under control.

Read more about ragweed allergies here.

Resources:

Costa S. Are Your Allergies Ready for a Relocation? U.S. News & World Report.  Aug 2014. http://health.usnews.com/health-news/health-wellness/articles/2015/08/14/are-your-allergies-ready-for-a-relocation.

Pongdee T. Ragweed Plants Packed with Pollen. American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology. Aug 2011. http://www.aaaai.org/Aaaai/media/MediaLibrary/PDF%20Documents/Libraries/EL-ragweed-patient.pdf.

Back to School with Food Allergies

Pediatric Food Allergy Doctor, Peachtree City, Fayetteville, Georgia

Back to School

School is right around the corner, and along with the excitement of new clothes, bright supplies, and fresh possibilities, your child may also have a few butterflies in the stomach. For a parent of a child with a severe food allergy, you may have some butterflies of your own. Many parents worry their child will accidentally eat a food they’re allergic to while at school, and suffer a severe reaction. Setting your child up at school with an epinephrine auto-injector (EAI) is important, but this also requires staff and personnel who can recognize an anaphylactic reaction and can correctly use the EAI.

Children need help from adults in managing their food allergies. One survey out of Mississippi schools revealed 97% had at least one child with a food allergy, but only 30% had action plans for these students. Schools were more likely to have action plans when the school nurse had received appropriate information from a physician. If you need refreshing on how to use your EAI, or would like assistance in educating personnel at your child’s school on recognizing and treating anaphylaxis, call our office today. Anaphylaxis action plans can also be written by physicians and distributed in daycares and schools.

Reference: O’Keefe AW, De Schryver S, Mill J, et al. Diagnosis and Management of Food Allergies: New and Emerging Options: A Systematic Review. Journal of Asthma and Allergy. 2014;7:141-164.

Allergist Versus Ear, Nose, and Throat Doctor

Allergy Doctor, Peachtree City, Atlanta, Georgia

Freedom Allergy, Ruchir Agrawal, Peachtree City, Fayetteville, Georgia

Why Choose an Allergist for your Allergy and Asthma?

Allergies and asthma are both chronic conditions, and warrant visiting a specialist for the best management. However, with so many specialists out there, how do you know which one to choose?  Read the FAQ below.

My allergies bother my ears, nose and throat – doesn’t this mean I should see an ear, nose and throat doctor?

Many times, patients go directly to an ear, nose and throat (ENT) doctor for their allergy symptoms. After all, don’t allergies bother your ears, nose and throat?

Ear, Nose and Throat doctors are surgeons who specialize mainly in structural problems that can be corrected with surgery. But many of these problems, such as difficulty breathing through the nose, or having a raspy voice or having trouble hearing, are actually due to allergies.  Allergies, eczema, and asthma are all chronic conditions that fall under the same umbrella of allergy medicine, and more than 50% of sinus problems are caused by allergies.  The other 50% are often caused by a combination of both allergy and non-allergy related problems. Continue reading

Georgia Spring Allergies

Seasonal Allergies, Allergy Doctor, Atlanta, Peachtree City, Georgia

Atlanta jumped 12 spots last year on the Allergy and Asthma Foundation of America’s (AAFA) list of Top 100 Most Challenging Places to Live with Spring Allergies.  Atlanta rose from #72 in 2013 to #60 in 2014 on this AAFA Allergy Capitals list.  As trees blossom and grasses sprout this year, it helps to know which plants peak during which months (see the chart below).  Talk to your allergist today to plan your best method of defense against these allergens!

Allergy Doctor Atlanta Peachtree City Georgia

Spring Allergies

Spring Allergies, Allergy Doctor, Peachtree City, Georgia

Allergy Doctor Ruchir Agrawal Peachtree City Georgia

Spring is right around the corner, and now is the time to schedule a visit with your allergist.  The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) suggests five things you should know about spring allergies.  Click Here to read more!

  1. Allergies are on the rise.

Studies show pollen counts have been gradually increasing over time, and even if you’ve never had allergies before, you could start developing them.  You can track Peachtree City pollen counts Here.

  1. It matters when you medicate!

If you suffer spring allergies, ACAAI recommends starting your medication two weeks before your symptoms typically begin.

  1. No “cure” exists for spring allergies…

…but allergy shots (immunotherapy) can help your symptoms in a big way.

  1. Allergies can trigger or worsen asthma.

If you are coughing, wheezing, or having trouble breathing, this could be asthma that is triggered by your allergies.  Be sure to talk to your allergist about these symptoms.

  1. “When in doubt, get checked out.”

If you have been suffering symptoms for more than two weeks, such as coughing, ongoing colds, nasal congestion, or trouble breathing, it would be a good idea to see an allergist for allergy testing and potential treatment.

Conditions & Procedures

Allergy & Asthma Doctor, Peachtree City, Marietta , Georgia

Conditions We Treat

  • Adverse Drug Reactions
  • Angioedema
  • Asthma
  • Allergic Rhinitis
  • Allergies (Seasonal, Food, Environmental)
  • Anaphylaxis
  • Aspirin Allergy and Desensitization
  • Chronic Cough
  • Cough from Allergies
  • Dry Eyes from Allergic Rhinitis
  • Dry Throat and Runny Nose
  • Eczema
  • Eosinophilic Esophagitis
  • Eosinophilic Disorders
  • Food Allergy
  • Food Intolerance (Comprehensive Diagnosis and Management)
  • Environmental Allergies
  • Functional Medicine
  • Headaches, Fatigue and Cold Symptoms
  • Hives/Urticaria
  • Immunodeficiency
  • Integrative Medicine
  • Recurrent Infections
  • Sinus and Nasal Infections
  • Sinusitis (Acute)
  • Sinusitis (Chronic)
  • Skin Rashes
  • Sneezing (Frequent and Prolonged)
  • Stuffy Nose
  • Vocal Cord Dysfunction
  • Wheezing

Procedures We Offer

Conditions We Treat

  • Adverse Drug Reactions
  • Angioedema
  • Asthma
  • Allergic Rhinitis
  • Allergies (Seasonal, Food, Environmental)
  • Anaphylaxis
  • Aspirin Allergy and Desensitization
  • Chronic Cough
  • Cough from Allergies
  • Dry Eyes from Allergic Rhinitis
  • Dry Throat and Runny Nose
  • Eczema
  • Eosinophilic Esophagitis
  • Eosinophilic Disorders
  • Food Allergy
  • Food Intolerance (Comprehensive Diagnosis and Management)
  • Environmental Allergies
  • Functional Medicine
  • Headaches, Fatigue and Cold Symptoms
  • Hives/Urticaria
  • Immunodeficiency
  • Integrative Medicine
  • Recurrent Infections
  • Sinus and Nasal Infections
  • Sinusitis (Acute)
  • Sinusitis (Chronic)
  • Skin Rashes
  • Sneezing (Frequent and Prolonged)
  • Stuffy Nose
  • Vocal Cord Dysfunction
  • Wheezing